S Scale

S Scale

Originally called "H-1" because it was half the size of Gauge 1 (1:32), the "S" name is derived from "sixty-fourth". In the U.S., American Flyer toy trains used this gauge, but it is also used for more precise modelling and supported by several manufacturers. In the UK, S scale modelling is largely the preserve of a dedicated few hand-building models or using a small number of available kits and parts, mostly depicting standard gauge prototypes but also narrow and broad gauge subjects too. The UK-based S Scale Model Railway Society is the oldest scale support society in the world, being first established in 1946. In the United States, S scale has a small but growing following in the modelling of standard-gauge railroads, especially those of the 1940s and 1950s era, a focus that is supported by S Helper Service[5] and American Models,[6] among others. This scale is also popular in North America to depict 3 ft (914 mm) narrow-gauge prototypes (using dedicated 14.28 mm (0.562 in) gauge track and known as "Sn3"), and elsewhere to depict the 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) narrow-gauge railways (using H0 scale 16.5 mm/​0.65 in gauge track and known as "Sn3​12") of South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.